Whether you are a prospective PDF looking for a position at UBC or a current UBC PDF seeking the next step in your career, this section provides valuable information to help you advance.

Becoming a PDF at UBC

The first step in finding a PDF position at UBC is to search the research interests of individual faculty members to locate a potential supervisor. Faculty members can be contacted directly to discuss potential PDF appointment opportunities, and applications can be made directly to faculty members.

Postdoctoral appointments at UBC are managed through individual faculties and departments. The Postdoctoral Fellows Office does not accept applications nor are we involved in the hiring process.

UBC PDF Postings

While most PDF positions at UBC can by found by contacting a faculty member directly, some positions may be posted on individual faculty websites. Please visit Faculty Career Opportunities for a comprehensive list of links to UBC's faculties. The following faculty members have indicated to us that they are actively looking to attract Postdocs.

Research Interests: applied microeconomics, macroeconomics, labor economics

Research Interests: family medicine, eHealth Adoption, eHealth Requirements Engineering, eHealth Ux/UI Design, software engineering, Decision Support Systems, Treatment Adherence, Consumer eHealth

Potential project areas:

Our lab is based in Victoria and connected to both the Island Medical Program and UVic Computer Science. We have a range of projects including: eHealth related projects connected to community based Electronic Medical record design and assessment of adoption; action research projects with partners related to health system improvement using EMRs in practice; consumer mHealth projects related to use of technology for patient reported outcomes in aging and in treatment adherence

Research Interests: Landscape ecology & spatial analysis, Ecosystem services, Reforestation, Conservation & Poverty Alleviation, Socio-ecological systems, Temperate & tropical forest & agroforestry systems

Potential project areas:

Forest restoration in tropical systems

Research Interests: Social psychology, Social cognition, Social influence, Evolutionary psychology

Potential project areas:

Research projects that examine specific evolved human motivational systems and their implications for human social cognition and social interaction.
Research projects that examine specific aspects of human social cognition and social interaction that have implications for social norms and collective beliefs.

Research Interests: Migration and Citizenship, Comparative Public Policy

Research Interests: Well-being, Stress processes, Adult development and aging, Depression, Emotions, Health behaviours, Cardiovascular disease

Potential project areas:

Stress processes and stress-buffering in daily life;
Role of daily positive experiences in adult development and aging;
Biological and behavioural pathways linking daily experiences to health outcomes;
Day-to-day dynamics of psychosocial well-being and health behaviours (e.g., sleep);
Biopsychosocial determinants of risk and outcomes for cardiovascular disease

Research Interests: Motor learning, Plasticity / Neuronal Regeneration , Motor System, Learning, Neurophysiology

Research Interests: Huntington disease, Disease progression, Diabetes

Potential project areas:

Hayden Lab Research Projects
Huntington Disease (HD) is a devastating incurable neurodegenerative disease that affects about 5,000 Canadians. Inheriting a single mutant copy of the Huntingtin (HTT) gene from either parent is sufficient to cause HD. The mutated HTT gene codes for production of the toxic, mutant huntingtin protein (mHTT) that is responsible for killing brain cells in HD. Importantly, the other, non-mutated (or normal) copy of the huntingtin protein is critical for the health of brain cells. Consequently, our research goals are to reduce mHTT through multipronged approaches that specifically target the mutant gene and also develop approaches to enhance the clearance of mutant protein.

My current research projects include:
Silencing the gene that causes Huntington disease– Mutant huntingtin protein is the cause of Huntington disease (HD) and engages in a variety of aberrant interactions in neurons. Preventing generation of this toxic protein by gene silencing, the process of switching off a gene, should prevent all subsequent pathology and prevent or delay the onset of HD. Everyone has two copies of the huntingtin gene. In HD, one of these copies carries the mutation while the other copy is normal. The normal huntingtin protein is important for maintaining neuronal health and long-term reduction of this protein may not be well-tolerated. We are developing a strategy of silencing only the mutant copy of a patient’s huntingtin gene using antisense oligonucleotides targeted to HD mutation-associated single nucleotide variants as a treatment for HD.
Modulating mHTT post-translational modifications (PTMs) to enhance its clearance – Huntingtin (HTT) undergoes a myriad of post-translational modifications (PTMs) including phosphorylation, proteolytic cleavages and fatty acylation that influence the protein function, localization and clearance. Those PTMs are essential for neuronal viability, but are altered in HD. We have shown that promoting or preventing specific HTT PTMs can either dramatically improve or exacerbate HD symptoms. There is also evidence that HTT PTMs work in concert and may regulate one another. However, the interactions between the networks of HTT PTMs remain mostly unstudied. Our objectives are therefore to identify new rate-limiting PTMs, characterize the interrelationship of the HTT PTM network in vivo and understand how it relates to HTT function, stability and clearance. This project will allow us to determine and validate molecular targets for therapeutic strategies that could be used in synergy with HTT gene silencing.
Discovery of novel therapeutic targets for neuroprotection in Huntington Disease – Glutamate excitotoxicity and mitochondrial dysfunction are critical, closely-linked pathogenic mechanisms in several acute and neurodegenerative brain disorders, including HD. Together, these processes contribute to altered intracellular calcium dynamics, bioenergetic defects, cell death signaling, and synaptic instability. We are investigating novel therapeutic targets involved in these pathways with the goal of improving mitochondrial health and normalizing synaptic function in HD.

Population genetics and epidemiology of the Huntington disease mutation – The HD mutation is associated with specific sets of genetic variants in the surrounding HTT gene, known as haplotypes. We are performing detailed investigations of haplotypes HD mutation in different populations around the world. Haplotypes of the HD mutation allow for identification of new targets for therapeutic gene silencing and offer insight into the origin of the HD mutation in different ethnic groups. We additionally study how many people have the HD mutation, how often this mutation results in HD symptoms, and how often unstable new mutations for HD occur in the general population.

Research Interests: Tuberculosis, Outbreaks

Potential project areas:

Tuberculosis genomic epidemiology

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UBC Faculty Careers

For current PDFs looking to embark on the next phase of their academic career, please visit Faculty Career Opportunities for links to UBC faculty websites. Faculty positions are are posted within their specific faculty.

Online Career Resources

After your first position at UBC, you may move to a PDF or faculty position at another university. Postings external to UBC may be found at the following websites: